salmon

Salmon Crêpe

It’s almost the weekend!

What is your favorite brunch menu? Pancakes, waffles, omelets… It’s hard to just pick one, but one of our favorites is bagel + smoked salmon + cream cheese! If you also LOVE this combination, try our Salmon Crêpe. It tastes just as good (if not better!), and looks a little fancier to brighten up your weekend.

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INGREDIENTS:
• 1 egg
• 1 tbsp sugar
• 1/4 tsp salt
• 1 cup milk
• 3/4 cup flour
• 1/2 tsp baking powder
• 2 tbsp vegetable oil
• Smoked salmon
• Cream cheese

DIRECTIONS:
1. Add the egg, sugar, salt, milk, flour, and baking powder into a blender and blend until smooth. Wait for 20 minutes, then add vegetable oil. Mix well.
2. Heat a large non-stick pan over medium-high heat. Slowly pour a little scoop of the batter while holding pan off the heat and swirl the batter in a circular motion to get a thin layer. Cook for about 1 1/2 minutes or until loosened from the bottom of the pan and lightly browned. Flip the crepe and cook for another minute until lightly browned. Remove from pan and place on a plate and continue the process until the batter is gone.
3. To assemble the crepes, spread a small amount of cream cheese and some smoked salmon. Roll the crepe and cut into 3 parts. Enjoy!

Salmon is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, a type of fat that has been associated with lower risk of cardiovascular and other diseases.

If you have some leftover smoked salmon, put it on a toast or rice cracker with some mashed avocado - a super easy breakfast/snack recipe!

Salmon Avocado

Turmeric Salmon

Everyday, we hear more and more stories about how good fish is for our health. Scientific studies have shown that consumption of fish and/or a type of fat in fish (called omega-3 fatty acids) is associated with improved body composition, cardiovascular health, and mental and cognitive status. 

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You might think cooking fish is difficult, but it's really easy - the key is to get fresh fish and avoid overcooking. Here is a recipe for perfectly cooked Turmeric Salmon:

INGREDIENTS:
• Two 4-ounce salmon steaks
• 1 tbsp coconut oil
• 1/2 tsp turmeric
• 1/4 tsp paprika
• dash of cayenne pepper
• dash of salt and black pepper
• 2 slices of lemon

DIRECTIONS:
1. Place two 4-ounce salmon steaks on separate pieces of parchment paper.
2. Lather each salmon steak in 1 Tbsp of coconut oil.
3. Sprinkle each salmon steak with 1/2 tsp turmeric, 1/4 tsp paprika, a dash of cayenne pepper, and a dash of kosher salt and black pepper.
4. Top each salmon steak with a slice of lemon.
5. Fold the parchment paper around each piece of salmon so that a small envelope is created (for more info on how to wrap the salmon: search "salmon en papillote").
6. Bake at 350 for 20-25 minutes.

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Using the spices not only add flavors to the salmon, but may also add health benefits! For example, turmeric has been traditionally used for digestive health and some clinical studies also suggest its benefits. 

REFERENCES:
1. Fish or n3-PUFA intake and body composition: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Obes Rev. 2014 Aug;15(8):657-65. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24891155
2. Fish consumption and risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective observational studies. Public Health Nutr. 2018 May;21(7):1297-1306. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29317009
3. Association between fish consumption and risk of dementia: a new study from China and a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Public Health Nutr. 2018 Mar 19:1-12. doi: 10.1017/S136898001800037X. [Epub ahead of print] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29551101
4. Fish consumption and depression in Korean adults: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2013-2015. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 Jan 17. doi: 10.1038/s41430-017-0083-9. [Epub ahead of print] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29339828
5. Efficacy of turmeric in the treatment of digestive disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol. Syst Rev. 2014 Jun 28;3:71. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24973984